DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib

DIY, Home

Since we found out we were pregnant (maybe even before), we knew we wanted to build our baby’s crib. Of course we I had my doubts. Would it be safe enough? What would we finish it with that would be safe for baby? Would it even look good? Psh… c’mon – I knew the answer to that last one.

I started by searching different styles of cribs on Pinterest and even DIY cribs to see if I could get any tips from other DIYers. I came across Back to Domestic’s DIY Cribs and loved the style. This style of crib looked like it could be built using the same general technique we used for our DIY Pottery Barn Farmhouse Bed, which gave me the confidence I needed to move forward.

I showed Kurt the crib style and he began building the crib using Google Sketchup so we could view it 3 dimensionally to scale before we dove in (Thank you LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture for the handy skills!) Here’s what it looked like once he had it drawn up to scale.

DIY Crib | DIYstinctlyMade.com

I did some further research on crib safety standards to be sure what we built would be safe enough for our little Baby Boehr (pronounced “bear”). BabyCenter.com lays out the crib safety standards (as of 2011) pretty well – you can view those standards here.

We decided to buy our baby mattress before starting to be sure our measurements for the crib would work. After getting our mattress, we headed to the hardware store for wood and supplies.

Supplies needed for our DIYstinctly Made DIY Crib

DIY Crib Building Supplies

  • 2 – 4”x4”x8’ pine boards
  • 2 – 2”x4”x10’ pine boards
  • 1 – 2″x2″x10′ pine board
  • 8 – 1”x2”x10’ pine boards
  • 7 – 1”x3”x10’ pine boards
  • 4 – 1”x6”x10’ pine boards
  • Finish nails
  • 3” screws
  • 3 1½” screws
  • 1 ½” screws
  • 1 pack of small metal “L” brackets (4 brackets/pack)
  • Wood glue

DIY Crib Finish Supplies

  • Wood filler
  • 220grit Sand paper
  • Orbit Sander
  • Rustoleum Varathane Stain + Poly (Early American)
  • Steel wool
  • Minwax Paste Wax

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

How we built our DIY Crib

This project took a couple of months with our frequent trips to Baton Rouge on the weekend during football season; therefore, I don’t have as many pictures of the process as I would like.

First, we tackled the sides of the crib. We laid out five 1″ x 6″ boards (cut to 36 ½” in length) side by side and attached two 1″ x 3″ boards (26 3/4″ in length) across the top and the bottom using wood glue, finish nails, and clamps (NOTE: the two outer 1″ x 6″ board’s width will need to be ripped in order to get the desired 26 3/4″ total width for the side). Next we flipped it over and attached two more 1″ x 3″ boards (26 3/4″ in length) across the top and the bottom using wood glue, 1 ½” screws, and clamps. We screwed the interior after nailing the exterior boards on so that the screws would help pull the wood together. We used a spade drill bit to create holes for the screws to sit beneath the surface of the wood. The decorative pieces were then attached to the outside using wood glue and finish nails.

How to build your own DIY Crib | DIYstinctlyMade.com

Next, we assembled the sides of the crib with vertical slats because we didn’t yet have 4×4 posts for our sides that were completed. We marked where each slat would go on two 1″ x 3″ boards (cut to 53″ in length), making sure that they were all  2 3/8″ apart (based on crib standard requirements, slats should be no more than 2 3/8 inches apart). The gaps between the two outer slats and the crib sides will be less than 2 3/8.” After we attached the slats to the 1″ x 3″ boards using 1 ½” screws and wood glue, I was a little bothered by the fact that the outer slat gaps would be smaller than the rest, but honestly now that its built. it looks great and I don’t even notice it. Next, we attached the bottom 2″ x 4″ boards (cut to 53″ in length) using wood glue, 3″ screws (drilled from the bottom), and our handy dandy clamps. At first we only screwed into the 1″ x 3″ that we previously attached, but after noticing that the 2″ x 4″ need to be more stable we screwed into a few slats as well. After the bottom was secure, we attached the top 1″ x 2″ runner (cut to 53″ in length) using wood glue and finish nails.

How to build your own DIY Crib | DIYstinctlyMade.com

Here are all 4 sides at this point. As you can see, I was also refinishing the changing table/dresser, but I’ll save that for another post 😉

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

Because we couldn’t find non-pressure treated 4x4s ANYWHERE, we were stuck at this point for some time. Luckily, my dad was able to find some non-pressure treated 4x6s in North Georgia. We picked them up when we went home for Thanksgiving. A couple of passes through my Dad’s beast of a table saw and we had ourselves non-pressure treated 4x4s! Once we got back home, Kurt couldn’t wait to finished the sides.

He cut our new 4″ x 4″ posts to be 43″ in length and attached them to the sides using 3 ½” screws and wood glue. He used a spade drill bit before hand to make holes to ensure the 3 ½” screws would reach the sides. If we had longer screws at the time, he would have used those instead… but ain’t nobody got time to run back to the store – so we made do. After the posts were on, He attached the 2″ x 4″ cap (cut to 37 3/4″ in length) using 3″ screws and wood glue. We used this same technique when attaching the posts and caps to our DIY Pottery Barn Farmhouse Bed.

How to build your own DIY Crib | DIYstinctlyMade.com

Finally, we built the mattress support according to the dimensions below using wood glue and screws to make it as sturdy as possible.

DIY Crib | DIYstinctlyMade.com

This support is what can be used to adjust the height of the mattress within the crib. Simply screw the support into the posts from below at the desired height. When the crib mattress needs to be “dropped,” it sits at the base of the crib with no screws necessary (shown in pictures).

Once all 4 sides and the mattress support were done we did a makeshift assembly to see how she looked – AMAZING!

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

Unfortunately, the crib wouldn’t fit into the nursery, so we had to disassemble it before reassembling once complete.

We filled all holes and wood cracks with sandable/stainable wood filler. After the wood filler dried, we sanded all pieces using 220 grit sand paper which made the wood as smooth as a baby’s bottom. Before we finished the crib, we found out we are having a little boy. We chose an outdoors theme for his room since daddy is an avid fisherman and hunter. To go with the theme, we wanted to stain the wood instead of paint it.

I did some more research trying to find an all-natural solution that wouldn’t harm the baby if he gnawed on the crib. I purchased Dark Raw Tung Oil from the Real Milk Paint Company… BUT, once I tested it on a piece of scrap wood I realized I didn’t like the color AND it would take for-ev-ver to apply. So, I did some more research and found out that commercial finishes are okay to use if they have been properly cured (typically 30 days).

We decided to go with Rustoleum’s Varathane Stain + Poly in Early American to cut back on steps – I am SO glad we went with this product. It was easy to apply, dried quickly, and because it is water based it was very easy to clean up (no harsh chemicals needed!) This product is a one-coat wonder! We applied on the thicker side, rather than doing multiple thin coats, so two coats were not needed.

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

After we had everything stained/varathaned, we lightly rubbed with steel wool to make everything as smooth as possible. Once perfectly smooth, we applied paste wax and buffed.

Once settled for a few days, we brought the pieces into the nursery and assembled. Kurt used his spade drill bit again to drill pocket holes on the bottom of  both sides of each side (with slats) so they could be screwed to the posts using 3 1/2″ screws. On a side note: a Kreg Jig would have come in reaaaal handy to make the pockets holes (this tool has since been added to my wishlist).

Once the bottoms were attached, we used a small “L” metal bracket to screw the underside of top of the sides with slats to the insides of the posts (See the pic below – side with slats on the left, post on the right).

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

We had a hard time at first trying to figure out the best way to attach the top of the sides with slats to the posts because we knew this crib would have to be disassembled and reassembled in the future as we have more babies. Ultimately, we decided on the brackets. They are very sturdy and and tuck nicely under the rail – we spray painted them black to make them less noticeable.

We are so proud of our DIYstinctly Made crib. Hopefully, it will stay in our family for generations to come (unless crib standards change of course 😉

Here are some photos of the finished crib in the nursery.

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

DIY Crib | DiystinctlyMade.com

UPDATE: We are thrilled SO many people have read and used our post and crib plans to build their very own crib! Our crib is still in use an I have to say the kid LOVES it. And we love that he can’t climb out… yet… BEFORE BUILDING, please review all questions and answers in the comments. We have received several repeat questions that have already been answered. Our crib DOES have gaps between the mattress and the sides however we use a crib bumper which covers the gaps so they have not been an issue. If you would like to build this crib to be used without bumpers, we suggest purchasing your mattress beforehand and making the necessary adjustments for a snug fit.

Check out the completed nursery in our Nursery Reveal post!

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225 thoughts on “DIY Crib

  1. This is the most beautiful crib! My husband and I have decided to follow your plans and build this ourselves. This is a huge endeavour for us but we’re excited!
    Do you sand each piece as you cut them or only at the end once everything is built together? What brand and type of wood glue do you use? (Expanding type, etc?)
    What is your plan for the mattress height adjustment?
    Would love to hear from you! Thank you

    1. Thank you, Cassie! We did not sand each before assembling, however, I would recommend it. We had a hard time getting to every square inch. For the glue we used Elmer’s Carpenter Wood Glue Max – here’s a link http://www.lowes.com/pd_7356-63-E7310_0__?productId=3821833&Ntt=

      For the higher mattress height adjustment, we plan on screwing the support to all 4 posts from the underside of the support sides. Once the mattress needs to be dropped, the support will be lowered to rest at the bottom (like in the pictures) and no screws are needed.

      Good luck with everything! I’d love to see the finished product!

      1. Thank you for all the information! We are going to start this project soon but it will likely take months for us to finish but I will send pictures when it’s complete 🙂

      2. Hey, love your crib. Loved it so much I just had to make it! So I’ve followed your directions as best as I could(sanding all along the way) and I’ve got my 4 sides and frame all set. I’m having some issues outing it all together though. Do you have any pictures of the crib interior looking down into it from above? I’d like too see how much overlap you have on the posts and the mattress frame. Also, when the mattress is elevated how did you prevent the extra space from the mattress to the sides (solid sides) mine has too much distance (1.5″) on either end. Nice work!!! We were thinking 2-tone white with espresso slats and a-frame.

      3. Thank you, Rob and Tiff! Unfortunately I don’t have any pics from above. We also have extra space in between the mattress and the solid sides because of the way the side boards are sandwiched between 2 boards (one on the interior and one on the exterior), however we use a bumper (breathable) which blocks off the gaps so we don’t personally mind them. You can modify the design and remove the inner boards that are at the top and bottom of the vertical side boards and attach the sides flush to the interior of the crib on the posts to eliminate these gaps.

  2. Hi!
    Your Super Amazing Awesome Crib caught our eye and we just had to feature it! We hope you like it as much as we do, but if not let us know and we’ll remove it lickety split!

    “Ana White and Team”

  3. I love the crib. For some reason the mattress slats have me feeling a bit uneasy. My kids are 6 and 8 now, but back when we had a crib I saw it used as a trampoline by three 5-year olds at the same time. I also climbed into it a couple of times myself. Your crib looks so sturdy, but the slats really feel like the weak point to me.

    1. We built a mattress support (the same size of the mattress) which have the slats permanently attached. Everything is glued/screwed together and seems pretty sturdy – I’ve even taken her for a ride standing/walking on the mattress while hanging pictures on the wall without any problems.

  4. Our sixth child just moved into a “big girl bed”, too late for us to use your amazing plans. What a beautiful crib-it will become a treasured heirloom for your family.

  5. I love this so much! A couple of questions… For the solid sides, did you do anything to attach the vertical boards together, or does sandwiching them keep them solid and secure? Also, would you mind sharing a rough cost estimate? Thank you for this!

    1. Sandwiching the vertical boards together keeps them solid – there are no moving those bad boys! In a perfect world, we would have let the boards “dry out” in a workshop before building because they have contracted slightly sense assembly leaving small gaps between some of them. Unfortunately, I didn’t track the pricing of this project as closely as some of my others… but all together, if you had to buy everything from scratch (wood, screws, glue, etc…) I’d say its less than $200 including the mattress.

  6. So, unless I missed it (if so I apologize), what size mattress and where did you purchase? Is there a standard size I assume? It’s been 10 years since our last one, looking forward to this project. Thanks for sharing!

    1. We purchased the Safety 1st Heavenly Dreams White Crib Mattress which is 52.5″L x 27.5″W x 5.5″H – Thickness: 5.5 inches. I believe all mattresses are around the same size but we bought ours beforehand just to make sure it was a good fit!

  7. Is there any consideration for height adjustability? Manufactured cribs have relatively simple means to raise/lower the mattress.

    1. and one more question :-\
      You describe the connection of the top of the side rails to the corner posts with a small L bracket. Looking at the pictures I can’t really see that connection and/or how it was done.

      1. Love this design I may have missed but how are the sides attached using the L brackets? a close up picture would be great I’m about to start building for our first child!!

  8. Still relatively new at wood work, but can you provide more details on where the brackets get attached? If you have a picture of the mattress at the higher level I think that would be helpful too. Can you provide an approximate ‘desired height’ where we should screw in the mattress support when raised? (I haven’t had an kids yet and don’t want to break my back if I place it too low)

    Thank you very much for your plans, cribs are very difficult to find online! 🙂

    1. Tess, sorry it’s taken me so long to get back with you. I’ve added a photo of the L brackets to the post. We set our mattress height so it would sit just below the bumper pads we have, so the mattress is 12 in from the top of the crib and the top of the mattress support is 17 in from the top of the crib.

  9. This crib is amazing wish I would have see it for my triplets it was hard for me to have them in different crib it would have been awesome to have them all in the same style of crib. I am going to build it for my sisters baby.
    What size boards did you use for the mattress support?

  10. Is the mattress directly on the mattress support or did you add a piece of plywood or something solid like that? If it is on the mattress support, does the mattress sag with pressure at all between the slats?

    1. The mattress is directly on the mattress slats. The mattress is a very firm foam mattress and we have not experienced any sagging (as of yet). If we do, we can always put a piece of plywood or add more slats as needed.

  11. This is amazing! I love your crib and would totally buy one if you sold them. This is exactly what I want for my son and can’t seem to find anywhere for sell. Enjoy your beautiful crib 🙂

  12. Thank you for the plans! I’ve been in full time ministry for the past 12 years, but a welder and machinist by trade so building precision parts out of steel is just not a problem. However, I have never built anything out of wood! I recently found a barn full of 100 yr old cypress boards, saw your post on FB and said “why not”? After all, after 6 kids and being the ripe young age of 45, my wife told me she was pregnant with #7 (we adopted 4) but this will be my only boy!!!! It’s almost finished now, would love to share some pics, and apparently my wife loves it because a changing table is on the horizon. Love it!!!

  13. Hello! My husband and his dad are building this crib for our second (a little boy) due at the end of summer! I am buying his bedding and had a question…will a crib skirt work on the crib in either position? It seems like a skirt may not work from what I can tell from the pictures.

    Thank you! We love this crib and I cannot wait for them to start!

    1. Yes! We have a crib skirt on ours! The crib skirt has 4 separate panels for each side instead of one continueous piece of fabric (not sure if some are made like that) so it fits perfectly in between the posts!

  14. I am obsessed with these plans and cannot wait to try them out! I know there have been a few questions about the mattress height adjustment, but I’m still a little lost on how this actually happens. How high would the mattress be when raised?

    1. Thank you! I hope it all works out well for you! You can set it at any height. Ours is roughly 12-13 inches from the top of the crib and it works nicely when I place him in it, not too low to where I have to reach too far to lay him down. I based our mattress height on the height of the bumper, so the top of the mattress is just below the bottom of the bumper (and the top of the bumper is along the top of the crib, if that makes sense).

  15. LOVE this crib! We are about to try this! One question regarding the mattress support. The outside dimensions of the mattress support are 52 7/8 x 27 1/2, so do you have more in depth instructions on what the 2×2’s need to be cut to to fit inside of these final dimensions? I don’t want to start the project and then have to play guess and hope it works to make sure it all fits in there properly.

  16. That has to be the most beautiful crib I’ve seen! Adding it to my “build this someday” list. One question: are the angled boards on the ends structurally necessary? Could it be made with just plain ends?
    Thanks!

    1. The height of the mattress can be adjusted by screwing the mattress support into the posts at different heights. Right now we have our mattress at it’s highest level. When it needs to be dropped, we will drop it all the way down to the bottom where it can sit on the edge of the slatted sides and not have to be screwed in.

  17. Thanks for sharing this post. I am currently building one right now out of 4/4 and 8/4 Ash. I milled all of the lumber down and getting close to assembly (pictures to come). I am curious how you went about attaching the 4×4 posts to the sides with the slats. Did you just secure it using the “L-Brackets” you spoke about earlier in the post? 4 L-Brackets seems like it would not be sturdy enough to support that entire load. Would you be willing to shed some more light on this? I was thinking about using threaded inserts for the assembly that way It can be taken down easily when needed and the screws will be locking into a metal fastener and not wood.

    1. The L-brackets are not load bearing and are used only along the top to keep the slatted sides in place. We screwed the bases of the slatted sides to the posts to bear the load. Threaded inserts sounds like a great idea for disassembly/reassembly!

  18. I am super stoked to make this crib for my brother and sister-in-law! I had originally planned on buying them one until I saw this beauty! I showed them the crib plans and they fell in love! I am so excited to get going on it! Thanks so much for the plans and cute little pictures! Enjoy your sweet baby boy! They grow up WAY too fast! I have 3 of my own and they are super crazy but fun! I hope to find you on Facebook and show you what we came up with! Thanks a million!

  19. Do you happen to know the measurements/angles of the angled boards on each end? My husband’s geometry is a little rusty…

  20. Oh my gosh! This is absolutely beautiful!! We are expecting January 2016, so we need to start building this crib now to have it finished for our baby. Thank you so much for the detailed instructions!!
    Great parents!👣

  21. Hey my husband followed yalls plan for the crib and we love it! Only problem is the standard crib mattress doesn’t fit snug in there. Did yall special order a mattress or do you just have gaps?? Thanks!

    1. The mattress we have fits snug on the slatted sides, but there is a gap between the mattress and the solid sides because of the way the center is inset between the posts. We use a bumper in our crib (not because of the gaps) but it does fill them. I think all crib mattresses are a standard size however we did buy ours before we built the crib to make adjustments as needed.

      1. What are the dimensions of your mattress used for this? Just want to confirm that I get the right one. Thanks!

  22. Your crib is gorgeous! My husband and I will be starting a family in the next year and are seriously thinking about building this crib! We both love it and he’s an experienced wood worker. Our only concern is the height of the sides. I can’t help but notice how high it comes up on you. Did you have any issues reaching in? I’m only about 5’4″ and I’m worried about not being able to reach all the way down to the mattress, especially for little babies. Can you shed any light on this? If you could change anything about the design, what would you do differently? Thanks so much for your time, I look forward to hearing from you, keep up the good work!

    1. In the picture where I am standing next to the crib, it is actually elevated on 3in-4in blocks because it had been raining. I am 5’4″ as well and have no issues with the height of the sides! If I had to change something about the design, I would adjust the tall sides so that they are more flush to the interior of the posts and crib. Centered on the posts, they leave larger gaps between the mattress and the sides, but for us it’s not an issue because we use a bumper.

      1. I just finished building this crib. The dimensions in the sketch up drawings are not totally accurate. I had to shorten some of the dimensions to make sure that a standard mattress fit with no gaps. I also used threaded inserts to attach the 4 sides. This works way better than the L brackets attached with screws. The threaded inserts allow for assembling and disassembling the crib without damaging the wood. I would look at these plans as a good starting poky but you will have to customize it to your own needs.
        Let me know if I can answer any questions.

      1. Hi Dan, great ideas to modify the existing plans to suite your needs. Can you share the modifications you made to prevent the gaps? Wouldn’t there be a gap regardless on the short ends because of the offset with the 4x4s? Small as it may be, looks to be half an inch or so.

      2. Hi Dan, I love your crib! I’m not sure about using the L brackets either. Do you have any close ups of how you used the threaded inserts for attaching the sides?I’ve never used them before so I’m unsure. Thanks

  23. I was just looking through the measurements and I was wondering, how does the mattress support that is 27 1/2″ wide, sit on the end cap(posts) lip, when that lip is only 26 3/4″ long? or does the mattress support only rest on the two side rails in the lowered position?

    1. No, we didn’t have any issues with screws going completely through any pieces BUT I would still check the length of any screws against any pieces they will be drilled into… Just to be sure 🙂

  24. Love the crib and building one myself. I have a few questions. First when you say the mattress support is dropped in the picture all the way is it resting on the 2×4 that’s on the bottom of the sides with the slats? Also how high up from the floor are those 2×4’s screwed into the 4×4’s. Thanks for your help and the inspiration!

    1. Yes, when the mattress support is dropped it rests on the 2×4’s that are on the bottom of the sides with slats. The bottom of the 2×4’s are are attached to the posts 10 1/4″ from the ground.

  25. Hi there!! I am currently building this! One question tho! How do you change the height? I was reading the comments but still seemed a bit confused on that. 😐

    1. The mattress support is screwed directly into the 4×4 posts in the raised position (we screwed into the post from the inside of the support). When it is in it’s lowered position, the mattress support rests on the lip on the slatted sides. Please read all comments on this as there are suggestions to other solutions if you don’t want to screw directly into the posts. good luck! I’d love to see your finished product!

  26. My husband and I are in the process of building this. We have everything painted and completed (painted it white for our baby girl) and he is just trying to figure out how to put the four sides together. I also have a crib skirt do you have a picture you can post of your crib at the heightened position with the skirt? He is trying to figure out how I can have the skirt and the mattress support be screwed into the four posts. Excited to have it almost done! Thank you for sharing!

  27. Not sure if you check this anymore, but my husband and I just finished this crib! Thanks for the great instructions! I just had one question about the paste wax though. What is the purpose of it? Is it something that you have to do to seal in the stain and poly or could you technically go without.
    We just weren’t sure if it adds a special texture or if it for safety reasons? Any light you could shed on the matter would be greatly appreciated – thanks!!

    1. No, you do not have to add it. We used steel wool to make the finish really soft after applying the varathane and decided to seal it with paste wax because we like the velvety texture. Since finishing the crib, we have used the varathane on other pieces and rubbed down with a brown paper bag to buff – works great and doesn’t mess with the varathane finish!

  28. I finished this crib a Few months back now and wanted to show the final product.

    I used all Ash from a tree in a our backyard that was dying. It was pretty gnarly looking so I thought the wood would have some character. The milled lumber was taking up space in my shop anyway.

    I used threaded inserts to attach the rail pieces to the beefy side pieces using threaded inserts which will be very useful when taking this apart and putting it back together in the future. This will prevent the wood from tearing out causing an unsafe crib.

    The crib is stained using 2 different colored stains. I started with applying a medium brown base coat letting it soak in to the wood for about 15-20 seconds. I then let the wood dry for 24 hours. After that, I came back with a weathered gray stain which was applied and immediately taken off. This is definitely a 2 person job. If you don’t get the gray off soon enough it will not allow the base coat to show through.

    I sanded with 320 sandpaper in between coats.

    All in all if I were to buy the material from a lumber yard it would have run me around 500 -600 dollars just in material, but since I had my own lumber it was very cheap. The project all in all took probably 3-4 weeks since all the lumber was rough sawn and needed to be jointed, planed, cut to length and sanded. I also rounded over all of the wood slats forming the “jail cell” using a 1/2″ round over bit on my router table. I did the same to all of the pieces that the baby will touch such as the main rails and the inside pieces. I ended up needing to do a glue up for the 4×4 posts since I milled all my wood to 8/4 instead 0f 16/4 stock. The 4×4 post turned out pretty well and they have some really interesting grain patterns.

    Take a look at the crib using the link below and let me know what you think.

  29. I finished this crib a Few months back now and wanted to show the final product.

    I used all Ash from a tree in a our backyard that was dying. It was pretty gnarly looking so I thought the wood would have some character. The milled lumber was taking up space in my shop anyway.

    I used threaded inserts to attach the rail pieces to the beefy side pieces using threaded inserts which will be very useful when taking this apart and putting it back together in the future. This will prevent the wood from tearing out causing an unsafe crib.

    The crib is stained using 2 different colored stains. I started with applying a medium brown base coat letting it soak in to the wood for about 15-20 seconds. I then let the wood dry for 24 hours. After that, I came back with a weathered gray stain which was applied and immediately taken off. This is definitely a 2 person job. If you don’t get the gray off soon enough it will not allow the base coat to show through.

    I sanded with 320 sandpaper in between coats.

    All in all if I were to buy the material from a lumber yard it would have run me around 500 -600 dollars just in material, but since I had my own lumber it was very cheap. The project all in all took probably 3-4 weeks since all the lumber was rough sawn and needed to be jointed, planed, cut to length and sanded. I also rounded over all of the wood slats forming the “jail cell” using a 1/2″ round over bit on my router table. I did the same to all of the pieces that the baby will touch such as the main rails and the inside pieces. I ended up needing to do a glue up for the 4×4 posts since I milled all my wood to 8/4 instead 0f 16/4 stock. The 4×4 post turned out pretty well and they have some really interesting grain patterns.

    Take a look at the crib using the link below and let me know what you think!

    Let me know if you have any questions

    1. Dan, I don’t see the mattress support in the pictures. Did you do something different? Also, I’m assuming the 2×4 caps are attached simply using wood glue and finish nails and covered up by wood filler? Great looking crib!!! Thanks to you and the Boehringers for making this project available to all of us. Going to start this project for our first baby girl due this coming February!

  30. I love this crib so much! My husband and I are preparing for a baby and he is going to build this . I do have a question, what is the overall length and width of the crib? I just want to make sure it fits on the wall I am putting it on. Thank you!!!

  31. Also, if you ripped 4x6s, which are actually 3.5″ thick, did you rip them down to 3.5 or 4? I ask because I noticed that you have some overhang on the 2×4 endcaps. How did you get the overhang if they are presumably the same thickness?

    1. Zack,
      I did not make the mattress support that is in the plans. I thought it was to bulky and added a lot of extra weight. Instead, I found a company that sells the same mattress supports that are installed in commercial cribs. This website is the only place I could find online to buy these.
      http://www.productsamerica.com/mattressspring.html
      The website is pretty bad but the customer service over the phone is great. I think my support was only 60 dollars. I have 4 different heights for the mattress support using threaded inserts again. This allows the heigh to be adjusted multiple times without damaging the wood.

      In regards to the 4×4 posts… The 4×4 posts are just a nominal thickness. The actual dimensions are 3.5 x 3.5. The top caps are actually 5″ wide by 35″ long and 1.5″ thick(with a 1/2″ round over on all sides). I attached the end caps using one 5″ lag screw and glue on each post to really bite into the wood and make a lasting connection. These were countersunk like all the rest and filled with stainable wood putty. Also remember, all of my lumber was milled by myself so I was able to customize all of my dimensions instead of going off of standard nominal dimensions from a Home improvement yard.

      Let me know of you have any more questions.

  32. With regard to the front and back, it appears when you attached the slats to the 1″ x 3″ boards using 1 ½” screws and wood glue you screwed through the slats into the 1″x 3″ boards. What type of wood filler did you use to cover up the screws?

  33. Absolutely amazing, I wish I had the skills needed to build something like this. My wife and I are expecting twins in April and I am running all over looking for American made furniture, finding nothing. The plans seem very straight forward and maybe I will give this a go. Would wood at Home Depot be OK to use, or should I look else where?

    1. You could buy most of your wood at Home Depot however out Home Depot only sells pressure treated 4x4s so you may have to look elsewhere for those. You won’t want to use pressure treated 4×4’s for indoor use.

  34. What can I say its an awesome looking crib. I have a total of 6 kids and we have had hand me down cribs and thinking that our now 4 year old would be our last child we gave it away.After a miscarriage we are now expecting another and OUR LAST ONE, lol. I got the idea of wanting to make our own crib because it would be something we can pass down. Thank you for putting this up for people and I’m a complete novice to carpentry but I hope it comes out as great as yours did. If I find a way I’ll send you a picture of it when its done.

  35. This crib is amazing! My parents used these plans to build our daughters crib. I have a quick question. We are having a hard time finding a breathable bumper that fits. What brand or which did you buy for this crib? I’d love to share a photo of the crib, but can’t quite figure out how on my phone.

    1. We bought a non breathable bumper first which fits great, then switched to this breathable bumper https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0013FGWD0/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1453930493&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=BreathableBaby&dpPl=1&dpID=41wvX4MYHaL&ref=plSrch when baby started rolling over. It comes in two pieces and doesn’t fit symmetrically, but it fits. Then we switched back to the regular bumpers because he started flailing his limbs and hitting the side of the crib forcefully in his sleep

  36. Looks great, I was wondering though how the pine has held up since it is a soft wood. Did it wind up scratched and dented? Thanks

  37. I love this crib and am wondering what were the dimensions of the mattress you bought . We are building this crib and need to buy a mattress.

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